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Correction to: A review of virulent Newcastle disease viruses in the United States and the role of wild birds in viral persistence and spread

Veterinary Research201748:77

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-017-0485-7

  • Received: 10 November 2017
  • Accepted: 13 November 2017
  • Published:

The original article was published in Veterinary Research 2017 48:68

Correction to: Vet Res (2017) 48:68 https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-017-0475-9

After publication of the article [1], it has been brought to our attention that Newcastle disease virus was incorrectly labeled as a Tier 1 USDA Select Agent. Newcastle disease virus is a USDA Select Agent but it is not a Tier 1 agent.

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Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), Chemical and Biological Defense Division (CBD), Oak Ridge, TN, USA
(2)
United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins, CO, USA

Reference

  1. Brown V, Bevins S (2017) A review of virulent Newcastle disease viruses in the United States and the role of wild birds in viral persistence and spread. Vet Res 48:68. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-017-0475-9 View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

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© The Author(s) 2017

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